Trade Secrets

I. Introduction Trade secrets law is concerned with the protection of technological and commercial information not generally known in the trade against unauthorized commercial use by others. The policy basis for trade secret protection is the desire to encourage research and development by providing protection to the originator of business information, and to maintain proper […]

Depending on the type of business involved, a business should decide what types of information should be protected as trade secrets. Once this decision has been made, the relevant information must be located within the business. This audit is a helpful step in the process of identifying trade secrets. One author{1} indicates, “another technique for […]

Religious Technology Center v. Lerma{1} dealt with the effect of postings on the Internet. Two postings had been made by a disgruntled former church member ten days before the Church of Scientology obtained a TRO. The Virginia district court found that the Internet posting made the information generally known at least to the relevant people […]

Economic Espionage Act of 1996 The Economic Espionage Act of 1996 (the “EEA”, now codified in 18 U.S.C. §§1831-1839) has created an important change in the law relating to the protection of trade secrets; namely, it provides for trade secret protection at the federal level. Specifically, the EEA was enacted as a federal criminal statute […]

A. Inevitable Disclosure Is Not The Law In Washington The only Washington case to mention inevitable disclosure is an unpublished Washington Court of Appeals case, Solutec Corp. v. Agnew, 88 Wash. App. 1067, 1997 WL 794496 (Wash. App. 1997) (noting the lack of Washington law on inevitable disclosure) (unpublished){1}. Solutec has no precedential value; therefore, […]

United States Trade Secret Law

November 7, 2009

Trade Secret Law, a Multi-State Accredited Continuing Legal Education Seminar I. Introduction Trade secrets law is concerned with the protection of technological and commercial information not generally known in the trade against unauthorized commercial use by others. The policy basis for trade secret protection is the desire to encourage research and development by providing protection […]

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